Pages

Monday, January 18, 2010

Bank Fraudsters & Scammers

If you're one of many like myself who receives endless emails regarding bank accounts being suspented for whatever reasons and all you have to do to reactivate the account is to simply login with your details, you are in for a scam of your lifetime.

Whenever I get one of these emails almost one every other day now, I always forward them to the fraud department at whichever bank this email claimed to have originated from and let the experts take care of it.

Just recently I've received another one from HSBC UK claiming that the account is suspended again. WOW!!! Someone has been busy or try to be anyway. Face value of the email everything looks legit. The email from and reply to email address looks to be legit HSBC UK addresses. Everything looks real until you have a closer look at where the email came from and you will find that the email didn't actually originate from HSBC UK but from Hanoi, Vietnam. Well for this instance anyway.

Anyway the web address is registered to a provider in Hanoi, Vietnam. But then if you have another closer look at the link that you're suppose to click on to activate your account it is actually registered to a provider in Seoul, Korea. Hmm... How can that be? It is because you've been scammed or will be if you're silly enough to have clicked on that link and actually entered your bank credentials.

If you do this, make sure you contact your bank ASAP to get your credentials changed before the fraudsters steal your hard earned savings away.

Remember this! Banks of anywhere will not email you ever for your personal details. If there is a problem they will usually call you or send you a physical letter to confirm a problem. Like wise these can be scammed as well so be extra double... tripple sure that you're not being scammed. If you even receive a letter or a phone call, make sure you get their name, department and or branch so you can call the bank's official contact number and get redirected to them to speak about any matter.

Do this and you will ensure that you won't get scammed!

UPDATE: Here is another one and this time it's asking to confirm my details. Silly bugger... The email originated from http://williamsonselectrical.co.uk. Nice

Post a Comment